The release of Dragon Quest VI: Realms of Revelation on mobile marks an ending of sorts. Dragon Quest VI concludes the Zenithian Trilogy — a connected storyline that starts with Dragon Quest IV and carries on through Dragon Quest V (though Dragon Quest games are thankfully engineered to let newcomers jump in at any time).

Dragon Quest VI is also the last title in Square-Enix’s mobile ports of the series’ Nintendo DS remakes. So what happens next? Will North America finally see Dragon Quest VII outside of its 2001 PlayStation release?

Let’s hope so.

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For now, Dragon Quest VI sees out this excellent line of ports on a high note. While it’s not as emotional or as story-heavy as Dragon Quest V, it’s practically unmatched in terms of the size of its quest. Dragon Quest VI commands a premium price as far as mobile games go, but if you’re into Japanese role-playing games (JRPGs) and you missed the Nintendo DS release, passing this up would be sillier than buying a petticoat for a Sea Slime.

Dragon Quest VI starts off in a slightly unusual manner. You (you’re the hero — don’t forget to name yourself) and your pals immediately throw yourselves at the game’s Ultimate Evil, who subsequently dispatches you quite neatly. Turns out it’s all just a dream (is it?), but the shadowy threat of the Ultimate Evil still looms in the lucid world. You soon find yourself roped into doing something about it.

As might be expected from a big fat epic RPG, there are friends to recruit because taking down the digital incarnation of Satan is not a job for a lone hero. Dragon Quest VI also sees the return of the job-change system, which was absent from Dragon Quest V. You can switch vocations and learn a host of skills that will aid you as the hours stretch on and the threats become stronger.

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At this point, there isn’t much new to say about the Dragon Quest mobile ports, but assurances can be made. The graphics survived the transition favorably, and the monster designs and animation from Dragon Ball Z manga-ka Akira Toriyama are joyful and packed with personality. The soundtrack is rich and engaging (a bit heavy on the synthesized brass for some reason), and there is a lot of content to work through.

With the summer travel season coming up, you might be in the market for an RPG that will keep you engaged on a plane or on a bus for hours at a time. Dragon Quest VI is that RPG, though you should consider buying the entire series for maximum engagement. For all you lonely travelers, it’ll do as a family substitute in a pinch. Think of Murdaw the Dreadfiend as the commanding father figure you never had as a child.

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It all boils down to this: If you’ve enjoyed the mobile Dragon Quest ports up ’til this point, Dragon Quest VI is a perfect topper. And if you’re looking to jump into the series with VI, that’s not a bad idea either.

In other words, no, you can’t go wrong with Dragon Quest VI.