After last Fall’s successful Kickstarter campaign, there has been a bit of buzz surrounding SeaCliff Interactive’s Super Roman Conquest. The game caught the eyes of gamers by introducing them to Ancient Rome in a three-dimensional, 2D environment. What that means for players is that while the graphics depict, flat, pixelated soldiers, the player has the ability to rotate through multiple fields of battle. With the scroll of the mouse wheel, players can instantly shift from a line of archers, besieging city walls in the foreground, and zoom to the marching centurions, heading into battle in the background.

In the pre-Alpha build that I played (which is currently available to the public on Super Roman Conquest’s IndieDB page), I led an assault into a traitorous city and claimed it for the glory of Rome. Even though SeaCliff Interactive made it very clear that the demo is still pre-Alpha, Super Roman Conquest played out great. The controls took a bit to adjust to, but by the end of the two quick-and-painless tutorials, I was comfortable enough to handle the one level included in the demo.

news

Starting out with an encampment on the edge of the city, players must maneuver their troops through the various lanes of travel, with the end goal of reaching the heart of the city and slaying the city leader. Planning ahead is essential, for there will be times when wood is needed to repair a bridge or build a ladder, and if not already accounted for, acquiring lumber may involve a costly detour through an enemy-heavy area.

Panning through the level to plan my route, and seeing that plan become a reality that led to victory was a very rewarding experience. I encourage gamers who enjoy strategy games, or gamers just looking for some fresh gameplay mechanics, to give Super Roman Conquest a shot.

Visit the official Super Roman Conquest website and check out the game on Steam Greenlight