Kingdom of Heroes

In the fast pace of mobile gaming it seems developers believe all folks have time for is repetitive clicking. 6Waves once again trades originality for a quick-fix experience, but does this Kingdom of Heroes truly save the day or just waste it?

Kingdom of Heroes

Kingdom of Heroes is yet another title in a long line of now prevalent social RPGs where the focus is on slowly building up an empire. Though the mechanics are weatherworn and repetitive, Kingdom of Heroes does have an undeniably alluring formula that just might satisfy fans of high fantasy.

If you’re looking for prose, look elsewhere – Kingdom of Heroes puts you right to work without any fanfare whatsoever. Much like many of the city management tropes found on iOS, you’ll manage your kingdom through farming, collecting taxes, and hiring new heroes to defend your keep. A sensible tutorial will hold your hand just long enough to get the feel of things, and then you’ll simply complete tasks that stack up on the left-hand side of the screen.

In addition to overseeing your kingdom, you’ll also take on quests through a separate menu. Unfortunately, quests are merely a matter of clicking a “quest” button over and over again, consuming energy in the process. This would otherwise be a fairly tedious affair were it not for the fact you’ll run out of energy before you feel the burn of repetition. You’ll be given the opportunity to appoint stats however you like, giving you some control over the pace of progression.

Kingdom of Heroes

And that is perhaps Kingdom of Heroes‘ strongest suit: gameplay progression. Not all of the adventure modes are unlocked from the start, and you’ll need to hire specific heroes in order to gain access to higher-level quests. New heroes work in much the same way, unlocking at specific levels. All this gives players something to work toward, and level requirements aren’t obnoxiously high.

Visually, Kingdom of Heroes is a decent enough looking game, with animations that are smooth and an interface that’s easy to navigate. The 2D backgrounds and sprites aren’t terribly impressive, but the game’s music and sound effects smooth over most of the rough edges of the game’s presentational shortcomings.

Kingdom of Heroes

Kingdom of Heroes is probably one of the more interesting and compelling RPGs of its sort, but that’s not necessarily saying much. You’re still simply pressing a quest button repeatedly during the adventure mode, rather than engaging in actual battles. The city-management components are extremely long in the tooth, and raids on other players are typical fair, offering only a barebones bullet point to a cookie-cutter formula. If you like orcs, elves, and other Lord of the Rings-esque fantasy trappings, give Kingdom of Heroes a try. Just don’t expect to be bowled over by its less-the-stellar presentation and pedestrian gameplay.