Social strategy gets bloody in Thirst of the Night

Kabam’s strategy games have tackled a wide range of subject matter. There’s science fiction, global conflict, and more recently organized crime. Now the developer is delving into the world of blood sucking vampires. But these aren’t your standard, charismatic vampires. No, Thirst of the Night takes place in a near future version of the world where the occult and technology mingle and vampires are taking over the globe.

As with most Kabam games, it’s the atmosphere that sets Thirst of the Night apart, at least during the initial portion of the game we played. The dark, gritty world feels unique. You’ll build glowing nightclubs alongside blood-spattered military training grounds and you’ll harvest blood in the same way you harvest steel and concrete.

Thirst of the Night

Thirst of the Night

As the game takes place in the future, technology also plays a large part in the experience. Buildings have a gothic-yet-futuristic look to them and you’ll be generating terrifying genetically modified soldiers to wage war against other vampire clans and human resistance forces. Of course, as with most Kabam games, these selling points are largely aesthetic. Thirst of the Night looks incredible, with detailed visuals imbued with lots of reds and purples and plenty of glowing lights and subtle animations. It ‘s a convincing vision of a world that’s been overrun by vampires.

But the gameplay itself plays out largely as it does in other games from the developer. Building up your city — which involves creating homes and other structures, upgrading buildings, training soldiers, generating resources, researching new technologies, and more — feels much as it does in games like Global Warfare. The design of the city is largely laid out already, giving you very little freedom to customize it to your liking.

Thirst of the Night

Thirst of the Night

The social features and combat are familiar as well. There’s a persistent chat window to communicate with other players and you can join alliances to strengthen your chances in battle. Attacking other cities involves little more than selecting what units you want to fight with, sending them on their way, and then waiting for a battle report to see how well they fared.

Thirst of the Night certainly appears to be both a deep and compelling experience along the same lines as other Kabam-developed strategy games, but, aside from the setting, we had a hard time finding anything that’s truly new. Of course, the game is still in beta, open to anyone on Kabam’s site and as a download through the Pokki platform.

No official release date has been announced for when Thirst of the Night will hit social networks like Facebook or Google+.