If you were looking to replace FarmVille with Farmandia, you may want to look elsewhere.

Farmandia can best be described as a “tried and true” farming game. While there is technically not much wrong here, the problem lies in the fact that there are much better alternatives out there with much more interesting ideas and activities.

Just last year, Zynga’s FarmVille launched and essentially set the groundwork and standard for farm games. While Farm Town technically came first, it was riddled with bugs and had very poor design all around. FarmVille is a highly successful game and still one of the top games played on Facebook consistently, so it would make sense for other developers to take notes and attempt to steal some of its glory.


Farmandia works just like we’ve come to expect farming games to work on Facebook. You start with a small plot of land to build a farm with. You’ll plant crops by clicking on them, select a crop, waiting for your farmer to complete them and then waiting some more for them to grow and become harvestable. Trees also run through the same cycle without the need to plant or plow them first.

You may also purchase items from the in-game Market to place on your farm such as animals, buildings, and decorative items. Animals include your typical farm animals such as pigs, chickens, sheep and horses along with more exotic and fantasy animals such as unicorns, peacocks, elephants, camels and more. Buildings include Houses, Henhouses, Toolsheds and Wells which all have different themes to accompany them. Decorations can vary from Holiday items like Santa Claus to Hay bales and Statues. If you like to decorate, you certainly have a lot of options to choose from in Farmandia.


Diamonds are the premium currency in Farmandia, and should be used for the more advanced items such as vehicles that make it easier to farm faster and farm upgrades. While certain items that cost Diamonds may eventually be purchasable with coins, items like vehicles can only be purchased with diamonds and should be given priority.

Another slightly different idea is the ability to create water on your farm. You can create as large of a pond as you’d like and purchase decorations for it if that represents your style. Unfortunately however, this ability has no practical use besides looking pretty.


Crafting does spice things up a little bit. Instead of simply collecting items and then trading them in like in other Facebook games, here you actually can use them to make Diamonds. While this does make Diamonds sound easy to collect, the collection items are very rare and can only be done a maximum of 15 times each.

Graphically, Farmandia is a very mixed bag. While some decorative items can look rather nice, other items and characters look downright ugly. The game attempts a 3D look that probably wasn’t the best choice, but it’s not the worst implementation I’ve seen of this type. There are also some strange graphical issues that are unexplainable such as your character looking like he is standing on bushes among other things. While the sound effects are generally not easy on the ears, the music is not half bad and even allows you to choose from a few different songs if you like.

As I said earlier in the review, there really isn’t much technically wrong with Farmandia, it just doesn’t vary from the norm enough to warrant you or anyone else to play it. If you really are aching for another farming game in your life, Farmandia will do but otherwise I would avoid it.