After Fix-It-Up: Kate’s Adventure, Kate is back for a new adventure with her two friends Martin and Steve. In Fix-it-up: World Tour she will travel to eighteen countries on five continents to fix, upgrade and sell all types of cars. The first Fix-It-Up game was an innovative and unexpected entry to the casual market, and Fix-it-up: World Tour manages to be just as valuable and entertaining.

The basic gameplay which already made the first part of this series so unique and interesting has stayed the same, with a lot of worthy twists and additions. You buy different sorts of cars like snakes, betas, erics, bees or superbikes. As in other building simulations cars in your possession provide you with regular income, and of course you are also able to upgrade them in various ways. You can repair and insure broken cars, you can tune, paint, and mod them.

In contrast to its predecessor, Fix-it-up: World Tour also offers the possibility to upgrade your shops, so that they are less polluting and increase the green points for your current shop permanently. Upgraded shops also increase the rent and the green points of cars which are upgraded there. Apart from this you are also able to hire experts for every building, including the repair shop, the disassembly, and the carwash. Those experts stay at the particular building for which they have been trained, which strongly decreases the time it takes to repair or upgrade cars.

Beside the task to acquire green points by upgrading or improving shops and cars the goals can be compared to those of similar titles in this genre. Either you have to gather a certain amount of money or establish a specific regular income, or you have to possess, buy or sell certain cars, hire experts, or upgrade certain buildings. Sometimes new goals will appear in the course of a level, but in contrast to other building simulations they are rarely unfair or impossible to fulfill at that point.

The game features 39 levels in story mode, 15 bonus levels, and one endless level for each location you already visited, which altogether means an impressive 72 levels. Locations include Mexico, Japan, Spain, South Africa, and a lot of other countries, while the time pressure is not too hard on each level. If you finish any level extremely fast, you will be awarded a gold award, if you need a little bit longer, you will still get a silver award, and if you are really struggling with any particular level, you have as much time as you need to progress.

While your performance on each level does not affect gameplay in any way, there is still a reward for finishing levels with silver awards. Each time you manage to do so you will earn a coin, which you can then invest to upgrade Kate’s mansion. This estate is simply beautiful to look at, and therefore most players will be very motivated to perform as well as possible.

The graphics and animations of the game are absolutely adorable, although they might be too demanding for older computers. Your workers are cleaning windshields, changing tires, pedestrians walk by your shop or advertise their on cars. The scenery mostly fits to the country at which you are currently playing and everything looks more polished than your average game. The storyline is of equal quality and progresses through comic strips between different locations and through speech bubbles throughout certain levels. The plot is not as predictable and formulaic as one is used to in case of time management games and building simulations.

But the best part of the game, without a doubt, is that different strategies can be used to solve a level, so that it is pure fun to replay levels to improve one’s own performance with an absolutely different tactic. If you fail in a level it is not due to a small, annoying detail, but probably because there is a more effective order to solve the different goals, or because there are features which are more helpful in that particular level.

Our issues with Fix-it-up: World Tour are only a few and only of minor importance. Sometimes there are obvious and annoying mistakes in language, which is a pity considering the story’s overall quality. On top of that the endless mode is a bit boring due to lack of any real challenge or new features. An engaging endless mode with some surprising twists and new tasks would have been icing on the cake, but of course this is complaining on a high level.

In the end Fix-it-up: World Tour definitely fulfills every expectation, though without being as innovative as the first game. The concept still works great and ensures the game’s rank being one of the few unique time management games out there. Enjoy a trip all over the world with an interesting story, gorgeous graphics, funny details and be prepared to invest at least six hours to do so.